5 Things You Never Knew About The Remembrance Poppy

  1. The poppy has been used since 1921 and was inspired by the World War I poem ‘In Flanders Fields’ written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae shortly after witnessing the death of a friend.
  2. They are distributed by The Royal British Legion in return for donations from the general public.  There is no set fee for a poppy.  The donations are used to help provide support for serving and ex-service British military personnel and their families.
  3. A team of around 30-50 people, most of which are disabled former British military personnel, hand make millions of the poppies at the Poppy Factory in Richmond every year.  The rest are made by machine at the Poppy Appeals HQ in Kent.
  4. The English poppies have 2 red petals and a green leaf held together by a green plastic stem.  The green leaf was only added in 1995.  Scottish poppies have 4 red petals and no green leaf.
  5. Contrary to what some may say, there is no right or wrong way to wear your poppy.  The Royal British Legion simply ask that you wear it with pride.

You can find out more about the poppy appeal at http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, Row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved, and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe;

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

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